Category: wikis

A welcome wiki

I have been a long-time enthusiast for Wiki technology. I started editing Wikipedia in 2003 and have completed literally thousands of edits over the years since then. I have also started internal wiki projects and contributed to shared wikis run by various professional groups (eg: the RIBA’s own Ribapedia). I was therefore delighted to read …

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The internet as a lifeline for SMEs

Given that most of the businesses active in the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) sectors are small or medium-sized enterprises (SMEs or SMBs), any research that looks at the impact of the recession upon SMEs’ use of the internet was going to attract my attention – particularly as it is something that I have written …

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Could Generation Z be more web-savvy than Generation Y?

Twitter really hit the headlines today, being the lead story on the front-page of today’s Guardian newspaper, with news that UK primary school children will study social media such as Twitter and Wikipedia as part of a new curriculum that includes more modern media and web-based skills as well as a greater focus on environmental …

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Ten things to manage in a recession: 4 – executive costs

This is the fourth in a series expanding on my friend Ross Sturleys’ Ten Things to Cut in a Recession Before You Cut Your Marketing (presented at last month’s CIMCIG conference and in recent Construction News marketing e-newsletters). Number four: “Cut executive costs” Ross argues that some businesses are over-blessed with expensive directors. He suggests …

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Social networks boost productivity

For many Generation X managers, work and socialising are two distinctly separate notions, and they therefore often seek to limit employees’ socialising so that they can “get on and do real work”. But what if that real work could actually be improved by socialising? What if social networking actually helped you work better? In late …

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Ten things to manage in a recession: 3 – administration

This is the third in a series expandng on my friend Ross Sturleys’ Ten Things to Cut in a Recession Before You Cut Your Marketing (presented at last month’s CIMCIG conference and in recent Construction News marketing e-newsletters). Number three: “Cut administration” Ross argues that there are opportunities, if money is really tight, for administration …

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Ten things to manage in a recession: 2 – meetings

This is the second in a series based on my friend Ross Sturleys’ Ten Things to Cut in a Recession Before You Cut Your Marketing (presented at last month’s CIMCIG conference and in recent Construction News marketing e-newsletters) – number one was “Cut association memberships”. Number two: “Cut meetings” Ross starts his diatribe against costly …

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Ten things to manage in a recession: 1 – memberships

My previous post about managing IT expenditure in a recession was focused on helping an architecture, engineering or construction (AEC) business reduce its day-to-day operational expenses. Deploying Software-as-a-Service solutions helps save money (that could then be invested in marketing or PR), and can give some competitive advantages and reputation benefits. But that might not matter …

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Value your Web 2.0 guerillas

On a train journey to Manchester today, I read Information Age‘s Effective IT 2009 report and focused on its section on communications and collaboration, including an article, Social understanding, mulling over the slow adoption of Web 2.0 technologies within enterprises. This article underlines that social computing can create new dynamics of information and knowledge transfer …

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CIMCIG

I am preparing my talk for Wednesday’s CIMCIG conference at the Building Centre in London (a happy return to the venue of Be2camp 2008 which I co-organised last year). The theme for the conference is Downturn Marketing: A survivors’ guide to recession, and I will be speaking about “Online: The rise and rise“: Many are …

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